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Do you ever get super attached to your characters?

Like really, really attached?

Because there’s this one character that I’ve been planning to kill off. The problem? I’m only outlining and I don’t think I’ll be able to do it. I’ve gotten too attached to her, and if I can’t kill her off in the outline, how will I be able to in the actual novel?

I’m sad just thinking about it.

Someone did point out that if I’m sad killing off a character, readers would likely be sad, too. Which is a good point, but at the same time I’m not sure I can do it.

I’ve been going, “J.K. Rowling managed to kill off tons of important characters! So did Rick Riordan and Brandon Mull and Suzanne Collins and Veronica Roth.” But that isn’t making me feel any better about it.

I know which way would be the better, stronger ending (The character dying). But still, there’s like a whirlwind in my mind, going “Do I kill her? Do I not? I DON’T KNNOOOWWW.”

Have you ever gotten too attached to a character that you’ve always planned to kill? Did you save them or kill them off anyone? I must know this.

Happy Saturday,

BlogSiggie

This is a mini post for a reason…I’ve got a friend who will be posting a guest post later, so watch out for that.

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5 thoughts on “Do you ever get super attached to your characters?

  1. Well, my honest answer is…no, I’ve never had any trouble killing off characters. However, reassessing your outline might help you–does this character really need to die? What does this person’s death add to the narrative? As an exercise, brainstorm five different endings for the book, one with this character’s death and four without. Which is best? Reaffirming to yourself that killing said character truly is the best choice might help you commit.

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    1. What I’m really shrugging with is that I KNOW it’s the better choice. The longer I dwell over it, the more I struggle. Maybe I’ll just have to write the scene both ways, I dunn

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      1. Another thing that might help is writing a scene that directly follows the death scene. Writing this out before you even begin writing the rest of the book can help you come to terms with this character’s death. That aftermath, rather than the death itself, can be the goal you write toward as you work on the rest of the story. (Note: This scene doesn’t have to ultimately be included as part of the story; it can just be an exercise.)

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  2. Maybe write it both ways and see which one a few “test” readers like better? Or you can keep the one where your character lives just for you, but make the one where she dies the “official” one?

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