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When will people stop trying to genetically engineer stuff?

13517444There is no cure for being stung.

Fiona doesn’t remember going to sleep. But when she opens her eyes, she discovers her entire world has been altered—her house is abandoned and broken, and the entire neighborhood is barren and dead. Even stranger is the tattoo on her right hand—a black oval with five marks on either side—that she doesn’t remember getting but somehow knows she must cover at any cost. She’s right.

Those bearing the tattoo have turned into mindless, violent beasts that roam the streets and sewers, preying upon the unbranded while a select few live protected inside a fortress-like wall, their lives devoted to rebuilding society and killing all who bear the mark.

Now Fiona has awakened branded, alone—and on the wrong side of the wall. (Synopsis taken from Goodreads)

You would think that fictional people would have learned by now. I mean, look what happened when some guy thought it would be a good idea to genetically engineer dinosaurs (we all know how that particular idea went over). But no, someone decides that they have to save the dying plants because people are killing all the lovely, fat little bumblebees so they genetically engineer a new, stronger breed.

But oh wait. This breed carries a flu. Oops. Let’s create a vaccine to fight the flu but has traces of the flu in it! That would work perfectly, wouldn’t it?

Now more people are getting the flu from the vaccine. Who would have thought? Heh.

Stupid little fictional people.

Anyways, this book is based in a world that is possibly not too far off. Fiona, our heroine, is thirteen one day, and the next day wakes up, her house dilapidated and in the body of what she thinks is her older sister. Which is to say, a women.

Fiona has been asleep for longer than she thought. The world outside is dead and dry, where people hunt down anyone with the black tattoo on their wrists and even more people live in the sewers to escape being sold to the black market were they’ll eventually find themselves locked in a cage fighting for their lives.

Fiona is not prepared for any of this. She can’t even remember falling asleep.

The book is based off of an interesting idea, and it’s an idea that could have been amazing. My problem with it? It mostly turned to romance. I was expecting this to be more fight-for-life, not fall in love with the kid who will kill you if you make the wrong move. And for a girl that used to be thirteen, as soon as Fiona wakes up she acts like the seventeen year old she now is. Maybe it’s just me, but she still should be acting like a thirteen-year-old. Being in a coma doesn’t cause this massive surge of maturity.

Other than that, it was an interesting book, never boring, though the flow did seem to kind of jerk to a stop now and then. And there were a few things thrown in that felt unnecessary to me. Plot twists that seemed pointless, unneeded characters, things like that. And there was one character named “Micklemoore”. Every time he was mentioned I would start thinking of the song “Thrift Shop”, which annoyed me to no end since I don’t even like that song.

But still, the book wasn’t horrible, and despite being slightly annoyed that it was more romance than dystopian, I’d read it again.

ThreeStarsMeanwhile, I am roasting in 80+ degree heat, which might seem like not that hot to some people, but for Seattle it’s like sitting in the oven. And I’ve also got the strangest craving for grilled cheese; the type of grilled cheese that is so bad that it’s good. You know what I’m talking about; white bread, America cheese, and that’s it.

Not idea why I want that. It’s weird.

Happy Wednesday,

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